Into the Arms of the Dragon

by William S. Phillips
$450.00
Unframed

Availability: Good

  • Certificate of Authentication
  • Numbered and Signed by Artist
  • Limited Edition of 350 Prints
  • Giclee on Paper
  • Image Size 30 Inches Tall by 27 Inches Wide.
Countersigned by surviving Doolittle members
Description
The Doolittle Raid on Japan was always designed as a one way mission - from the carrier to friendly airfields in China by way of Tokyo. Due to early discovery by Japanese picket boats, Captain David Jones and the rest of Crew 5 (aircraft 02283) left the deck of the USS Hornet knowing their one-way trip was perilously shorter. They knew that their B-25 did not have the range to make those friendly airfields, and getting to the China coast or past Japanese-occupied China would take great skill and uncommon luck. At a small break in the cloud cover over Chu Chow the members of Crew 5, who could coax their aircraft no further, left the plane, trusting their parachutes, the wind and the Chinese people to lead them to safety. In Chinese folklore the long, or dragon, symbolizes all that is good - abundance, prosperity, good fortune, nobility, and divine protection, as well as the Chinese people themselves. The dragon is believed to be the benevolent guardian of water, as well as life-giving rain and storms. As they tumbled into the stormy night sky, David Jones and his crew entrusted their safety and their lives to the arms of the dragon. The Chinese paid dearly for the aid and shelter they provided to American soldiers. In the Zhejiang-Jiangxi Campaign, Japanese forces killed an estimated 250,000 Chinese civilians as retaliation and intimidation to prevent further assistance of American soldiers. The brave sacrifices of the Chinese saved many lives and solidified the American people in their determination to succeed. William S. Phillips inspiring new limited edition Into the Arms of the Dragon pays tribute to the combined efforts of two nations. Both the Fine Art Limited Edition Giclee Canvas and Fine Art Limited Edition Giclee Print of this spectacular image have been signed by surviving members of Doolittle's Raiders.
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The Artist

William S. Phillips

Phillips grew up loving art but never thought he could make it his livelihood. At college he majored in criminology and he had been accepted into law school when four of his paintings were sold at an airport restaurant. That was all the incentive he needed to begin his work as a fine art painter. Bill Phillips is now the aviation artist of choice for many American heroes and the nostalgic landscape artist of choice for many collectors. Bill's strengths as a landscape painter are what gave him an edge in the aviation field - respect and reverence for a time and place. When one sees his aviation pieces, thoughts are about the courageous individuals who risked their lives for our freedom. In Bill's landscapes, the viewer understands fully what that freedom is ... the precious values that make life worth living.

After one of his paintings was presented to King Hussein of Jordan, Phillips was commissioned by the Royal Jordanian Air Force to create sixteen major paintings, many of which now hang in the Royal Jordanian Air Force Museum in Amman. The Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum presented a one-man show of Phillips' work in 1986; he is one of only a few artists to have been so honored.

In 1988, Phillips was chosen to be a U.S. Navy combat artist. For his outstanding work, the artist was awarded the Navy's Meritorious Public Service Award and the Air Force Sergeants Association's Americanism Medal. At least one of Phillips' works was chosen in the top 100 each time he entered "Art for the Parks," the prestigious annual fund-raiser for the National Park Service, and he received the Art History Award from the National Park Foundation several times.

September 11, 2001, hit Phillips very hard emotionally. Out of his distress came the painting A Prayer for My Brother. Fine art prints of this piece have been placed in many fire departments across the country, with a portion of the proceeds going to help families of fallen firefighters.

In 2004, he was chosen by the National Park Service to be the first Artist in Residence at the Grand Canyon where his assignment included paintings to interpret the park's purpose as a place of pleasure and its importance as a national treasure.

He is regularly invited to participate in the annual Masters of the American West Exhibition and Sale at the Autry National Center in Los Angeles, an invitational for the top artists in the US. Bill is currently working on a large project documenting the Los Angeles Fire Department which will be placed in their museum. In October, 2013, the artist was inducted into the Oregon Aviation Hall of Honor, along with Doolittle Raider co-pilot Robert Emmens.

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