Crow Indian with Peace Pipe

by James Bama

Availability: Sold-Out

  • Certificate of Authentication
  • Numbered and Signed by Artist
  • Limited Edition of 75 Canvases
  • Giclee on Canvas
  • Image Size 17 Inches Tall by 21 Inches Wide.
Description
I painted a lot of old time Westerners and cowboys, Indians, outfitters and people with wrinkles. But I painted them as people. That they were Westerners was incidental. If I had moved to New England as I first intended, I would have painted wrinkled fisherman. - James Bama James Bama met Henry Bright Wings during a medicine ceremony performed in the tepee of a Crow medicine man in Wyola, Montana. He was then 68. Bama liked his classic face, which he thought would have been appropriate on a buffalo nickel. When Bright Wings visited Old Trail Town in Cody, Wyoming several years later, Bama dressed him in historical costume including a pre-1900 headdress and a very old buffalo robe from the Old Trail Town Museum in Cody. In earlier times the right to wear a headdress had to be earned, usually in battle. Today even women and children sometimes wear a showy nontraditional war bonnet for pow-wow dance parades and celebrations. Many men feel that their age is entitlement enough, but others will not wear a headdress because they do not consider it their proper. Bama met a Pine Ridge Reservation Indian who would not pose in a headdress even though he was 45 years old and certainly looked venerable enough. During the Indian Wars of the post-Civil War years, Bright Wings' people, the Crows, frequently allied themselves with the military against such traditional enemies as the Sioux and the Cheyenne. Crow scouts rode to their deaths with Custer.
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The Artist

James Bama

James Bama was born in 1926 and grew up in the Northeast. He followed his early interest in art through New York's specialized High School of Music and Art and the Art Students League. As a professional, Bama has earned a reputation for several facets of his talent. He freelanced briefly before spending fifteen years at the respected Charles E. Cooper Studios - at the time, the country's top firm of illustrators - and more freelancing followed. Bama's activities during this period were highlighted by artwork for the New York Giants football team, the Baseball and Football Halls of Fame, the U.S. Air Force and The Saturday Evening Post. Fans of pop culture may know him best as the artist who portrayed Doc Savage on sixty-two memorable book covers. Then Bama decided it was finally time to do what he most wanted to do. He moved west to Wyoming, where an artist "can trace the beginnings of Western history; see the oldest weapons, saddles and guns and be close to Indian culture." He sold his first Western fine art painting soon after the move. The distinctive work of James Bama combines tradition with modern realities. In his much-acclaimed studies, Bama shows the contemporary West preserving its traditional culture. His portraits of inhabitants of the plains and mountains capture the true character of the West. Today the paintings of James Bama are part of many prestigious collections. Bama has been represented in major exhibitions throughout the West and has been presented in one-man shows in New York City. Jim was inducted into the Illustrator's Hall of Fame June 28, 2000. Through his portraits of real people of the new West re-creating their history and heritage, Bama pays homage to the Old West and is renowned in yet another realm of the art world.

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